Weekly Recap: Piaggio Gita, Senstone, Windows on Git, Android Wear 2, etc.

Piaggio Gita

Piaggio Gita.

Piaggio Gita.

Piaggio Gita.

Piaggio, the Italian company that brought us the timeless Vespa, recently unveiled Gita, a rolling trunk that dutifully follows its owner around. The barrel-like container was developed in Boston by Piaggio Fast Forward, a company dedicated to creating smart, lightweight vehicles. Gita, at 66 cm high, can carry up to 18 kg. Its name means “escapade” or “quick getaway” in Italian. Gita can follow its owner in an urban setting, then navigate its own way on itineraries it already knows. Its top speed is 35 km/h, which is pretty impressive for this type of vehicle. The Gita will be thoroughly tested in real-life conditions before its release, in 2018. Piaggio also presented Kilo, a more powerful with a third wheel able to carry up to 100 kg. 

The Verge, Circuit Breaker, “The makers of Vespa designed a cute robot to carry your stuff.”

 

Senstone

Senstone is a voice-recording device that looks like a large brooch. You can pin it to your collar, wear it as a pendant, or even as a bracelet. Just tap on a button and record your latest flash of inspiration; the companion app sends the audio file to the Cloud, then retrieves a text version of the recording. The system can interact with other applications, such as Trello and Evernote. Launched on Kickstarter, Senstone should support 11 languages and be available next July.

Mashable, “This wearable can record everything you say — then write it down.”

 

Git does Windows

LG Watch Sport.

Git, the open source distributed version control system created by Linus Torvalds to handle Linux's decentralized development model, is being used for a rather surprising project: Windows. The Windows codebase is exceptionally heavy, with its many decades of history, which posed quite a challenge for decentralized management: the repository already tops 300GB of data and millions of files. Drawing on its extensive experience, Microsoft can make a significant contribution to Git, for example by enhancing its ability to manage extremely bulky codebases like Windows. Yet another sign of the profound cultural revolution sweeping Microsoft.

Ars Technica, “Microsoft hosts the Windows source in a monstrous 300GB Git repository.”

 

Android Wear 2

LG Watch Sport.

After months of delay, Google is finally launching Android Wear 2.0 with two new watches from LG: the LG Watch Style and the LG Watch Sport. The update, which will roll out to more watches later this month, is a complete redesign of Google’s smart watch platform, with a darker color scheme, bringing the Google Assistant and standalone apps to your wrist. Perhaps the most significant change is a new, watch-based version of the Play Store, which allows you to download and run apps independently of your smartphone. If you have an LTE-enabled watch, this completely untethers your watch from your smartphone.

Mashable, “With Android Wear 2.0, Google targets the Apple Watch by imitating it.”

The Verge, Circuit Breaker, “The LG Watch Sport is beautiful precisely because it’s big.”

 

Slack me some money please

Slack users in the U.S., UK, Canada and Australia will be able to make PayPal payments in Slack. You can download it from the Slack App Directory, and to use it, you'll have to link your PayPal and and Slack accounts. Sending money in Slack is as easy as typing "paypal" as a slash command, and you can send up to US$10,000 per transaction.

Mashable, “Need cash? Let me Slack it to you.”

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This entry was posted in Weekly recap
by Laurent Gloaguen.
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